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22 Responses to “Getting Physical With Memory”

  1. Casey on January 16th, 2009 5:32 pm

    Sorry to nit-pick. On the first graphic, “4 Request Pins REQ[4:0]” looks like a typo to me.

  2. Gustavo Duarte on January 16th, 2009 11:46 pm

    @Casey: Don’t be sorry, I appreciate it. Fixed. Thanks!

  3. JK on January 16th, 2009 11:51 pm

    I wish your blog was around when I was at college. Very useful stuff.

  4. Santiago on January 17th, 2009 4:05 am

    I think the “Attribute Signals” table has another typo: Both values for the Write-protected and Write-back items are “110″. Cheers

  5. Gustavo Duarte on January 17th, 2009 12:10 pm

    @Santiago: Fixed, thanks for letting me know. The Write-back should have been 111. Have a great weekend.

  6. McGrew Security Blog » Blog Archive » Gustavo Duarte’s Great Internals Series on January 27th, 2009 3:23 pm

    […] Getting Physical With Memory […]

  7. links for 2009-01-27 « Donghai Ma on January 27th, 2009 9:00 pm

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  8. Romeo on January 29th, 2009 12:17 pm

    Great post. Looking how ugly the Intel architecture is, it reminded me of a famous quotation of a computer scientist whose name I don’t remember now, that once said something like this: “Cache is not architecture. It is a performance hack”. Indeed. Cheers,

    Romeo

    P.S. Seu trabalho tem sido considerado muitíssimo educativo. Abraços de um conterrâneo.

  9. avaz on February 17th, 2009 1:29 am

    ..awesome blog, really useful stuff..hope you don’t mind me pinching some of your diagrams for my network engineering course ;-)

    Cheers

  10. Gustavo Duarte on February 18th, 2009 8:55 am

    @avaz: That’s fine, I’m happy to hear about the stuff being used in courses. I only ask that you credit the blog (say, put the URL somewhere so people might reach it). Cheers.

  11. Ya-tou & me » Blog Archive » How The Kernel Manages Your Memory on February 19th, 2009 1:43 am

    […] as a large block called the physical address space. While memory operations on the bus are somewhat involved, we can ignore that here and assume that physical addresses range from zero to the top of available […]

  12. How The Kernel Manages Your Memory « Motherboard Blog on May 14th, 2009 4:41 pm

    […] as a large block called the physical address space. While memory operations on the bus are somewhat involved, we can ignore that here and assume that physical addresses range from zero to the top of available […]

  13. Khushal Singh Narooka on July 19th, 2009 9:14 pm

    Fantastic blog I ever found over web, well explained and exceptionally good diagrams.

    Regards\ Khushal

  14. avinash on July 22nd, 2009 3:59 am

    good job gustavo…… I am become fan of you :)

  15. Samip on February 3rd, 2010 6:01 pm

    I had that “aagh” moment as I always wondered how “volatile” keyword does its function and description of this bus explains a lot of things. I assume kernel marks them as uncacheable and hence everything else is taken care by hardware…. Thank You for wonderful article…

  16. Brutus Processus – Linux Attitude on April 21st, 2010 10:04 am

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  17. women seeking women on August 28th, 2010 12:28 am

    I had that “aagh” moment as I always wondered how “volatile” keyword does its function and description of this bus explains a lot of things. I assume kernel marks them as uncacheable and hence everything else is taken care by hardware…. Thank You for wonderful article…

  18. Tyler on March 21st, 2011 1:31 pm

    @Samip: Actually, I think the ‘volatile’ keyword doesn’t work that way. It just tells the compiler that the value can’t be cached in a registry. You can still run into subtle issues caused by having copies kept in multiple cache lines. The guy over at Ridiculous Fish has a good discussion about this: http://ridiculousfish.com/blog/archives/2007/02/17/barrier/

  19. How the Linux kernel manages your memory « DEEPAK.IO on May 6th, 2011 6:29 pm

    […] as a large block called the physical address space. While memory operations on the bus are somewhat involved, we can ignore that here and assume that physical addresses range from zero to the top of available […]

  20. Isa on June 27th, 2011 10:27 pm

    Hi Gustavo,\ I’ve been following all the articles you have written about OS. So far they’ve been great reference for me since I am now studying Linux. I am 4th grade CS student. It would be great if you can write a little about how device driver work in Linux too, since I heard the best way to start learning Linux kernel is thru it’s device drivers. Thank you very much.

  21. Never too late » 虚拟内存,地址空间,page cache on January 2nd, 2013 11:24 am

    […] Getting Physical With Memory […]

  22. Ash on October 1st, 2013 2:07 pm

    You should seriously consider writing more articles like this Gustavo. I find your whole series on memory and kernel very insightful. Please continue writing posts like this!

    Thanks,\ Ash

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